Jeffersonian's Home Page
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Welcome to my home page. My two overriding passions are the cause of Liberty, especially in defense of the Constitution & Bill of Rights of the United States of America; and the collection & study of weapons, especially firearms.
Criminals Prefer Unarmed Victims. Politicians Prefer Unarmed Peasants. I AM NONE OF THESE THINGS.


BLOG --> Read the Rifleman's Journal
(Archive)

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CONTENTS:
The Jeffersonian Republic project | Activism posters and images | The Wisdom of Rudyard Kipling
The Declaration of Independence | The Constitution | The Bill of Rights
The Four Rules of Firearms Safety | How to Reload Ammunition | LINKS


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These local and national organizations fight for our right to defend ourselves and our freedom. Please give them your support.
THESE PAGES ARE BLACK IN PROTEST OF THE ONGOING VIOLATIONS OF CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS BY GOVERNMENT FORCES.



October 3, 1969. In a no knock drug raid launched on the wrong apartment in Whittier, California, Heyward Dyer was killed by a police officer's negligent discharge while holding his 2 year old son. He was the first innocent casualty of the modern war on drugs. The first of many, many more.

On 5 October 1882, Robert Goddard, father of modern rocketry, was born in Worcester, Massachusetts.

On 14 October 1943, some three hundred condemned prisoners - Jews, Russians, Gypsies, and others - escaped from the Sobibor extermination camp in Nazi-occupied Poland.
THE NAZIS DIDN'T JUST LET THEM GO. There were no UN "Peacekeepers." HOW DID THEY GET OUT?
They fabricated WEAPONS, or STOLE them from the guards, and FOUGHT THEIR WAY OUT.
There's a lesson here. Learn it.

On 14 October 1947, Captain Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager of the United States Air Force, flying the Bell X-1, became the first man to exceed the speed of sound in controlled flight.

On 16 October 1991, a madman drove a truck through the walls of Luby's Cafeteria in Kileen, Texas, and began methodically murdering the customers. Suzanna Hupp could have stopped the ensuing massacre, but the law did not allow her to carry her concealed weapon into the cafeteria.
Disarmed by a deadly law, she watched helplessly as her own parents were murdered.
Hupp was elected to the legislature and changed the law to allow citizens to defend themselves.

On 19 October 1781 at Yorktown, Virginia, British General Charles Cornwallis surrendered his forces to the Continental Army under General George Washington, effectively ending the American War of Independence.

11 November is now known as Veterans' Day. Go find one and thank him.
Originally, this date was Armistice Day, the day the First World War ended in 1918.
If not for American intervention in the spring of 1917, those ignorant Europeans would probably still have been slaughtering each other in the trenches for years.
Considering how they're treating us these days, maybe we should have left them to it.

On 16 November 1864, Union general William Tecumseh Sherman began his army's notorious 300-mile march to Savannah with the stated intention to "make Georgia howl." For several infamous actions by Sherman's troops during this march, particularly the widespread looting of civilian homes and the burning of the city of Atlanta, Sherman is to this day considered a war criminal by Southerners, Confederate partisans and anti-Federalists.

On Sunday, 7 December 1941, air and naval forces of the Empire of Japan attacked the United States military base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
- before a formal declaration of war.

THAT REALLY MADE US MAD.

On 13 December 1937, invading Imperial Japanese troops entered the city of Nanking in China. The months of horrific atrocities which followed are collectively known as the Rape of Nanking.

On 15 December 1791, the Bill of Rights was adopted as the first ten Amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America.

On 17 December 1903, brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright made the first successful powered, heavier-than-air flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

On the day after Christmas, 26 December 1776, General George Washington led the tired, underfed, ill-equipped Continental Army in a raid against a Hessian camp at Trenton, New Jersey. After a precarious crossing of the freezing Delaware River, the American patriots surprised and vanquished the British-employed German mercenaries, seizing badly-needed stores of food, weapons, ammunition, and other supplies.